Presentations and Workshops

2015

  • Poster Session: Teachers' understanding of ratios and their connections to fractions
    AERA Annual Meeting 2015
    Chicago, IL
    Friday April 17th 2015
    Presenters:
    - Gili Nagar*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    - Travis Weiland*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    - Chandra H. Orrill*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    - James P. Burke*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    (4:05pm - 5:35 pm)
    In this study, we considered how middle school teachers understood the relationship between fractions and ratios. We used two instruments to collect data from 11 teachers and relied on Knowledge in Pieces (diSessa, 2006) as a lens for considering understandings teachers have and how coherent those understandings are. From our analysis, we developed three main findings: participants did not have a single definition for ratios; they used specific vocabulary when discussing ratios; and their language evoked additive strategies rather than multiplicative relationships. When considering the coherence of participants' understandings we concluded that they each had a number of knowledge resources, but that those resources may not yet be well-connected to each other. This has implications for professional development.
  • Poster Session: Epistemic Network Analysis as a tool for exploring teachers' understanding of similarity and proportion
    AERA Annual Meeting 2015
    Chicago, IL
    Friday April 17th 2015
    Presenters:
    - Timothy Marum*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    - Chandra H. Orrill*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    - James P. Burke*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    (4:05pm - 5:35 pm)
    This study examines the ways in which middle school teachers understand and explain the relationship between similarity and proportions. We acknowledge that an individual's coherence of knowledge is their ability to recall and synthesize multiple and highly integrated resources frequently in diverse contexts. Our work is grounded in the knowledge in pieces (KiP; diSessa 1988, 2006) theory which suggests that we accumulate our understandings of the world and store them as a variety of knowledge resources to be used in various combinations based on a given situation. This study relies on epistemic network analysis (ENA; Shaffer et al., 2009) to analyze coherence. We found that teachers use different resources to think about the relationships between similarity and proportions.
  • Poster Session: Analyzing coherence of teacher's knowledge relating fractions and ratios
    AERA Annual Meeting 2015
    Chicago, IL
    Friday April 17th 2015
    Presenters:
    - Travis Weiland*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    - Gili Nagar*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    - Chandra H. Orrill*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    - James P. Burke*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    (4:05pm - 5:35 pm)
    In this study, we use a new analysis tool, Epistemic Network Analysis (Shaffer et al., 2009) to demonstrate and highlight connections among knowledge resources that middle school mathematics teachers evoke while relating fractions and ratios. Through constant immersion in the data from coding, patterns in the resources that the participants used emerged that pointed toward possible differences in the participants' use of resources. Participants were grouped based on the patterns in their resources. The findings discuss how these groups were formed from the Epistemic Network Analysis and discuss the differences in the connections of the participant's knowledge resources in each group.
  • Poster Session: A survey of teachers' beliefs about statistics and their relationship to teachers' resources
    AERA Annual Meeting 2015
    Chicago, IL
    Friday April 17th 2015
    Presenter:
    - Travis Weiland*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    (4:05pm - 5:35 pm)
    This paper describes a survey of high school teachers' beliefs toward the concepts described in the statistics content strand of the CCSSM (NGA Center & CCSO, 2010) and their resources, as well as possible relationships between their beliefs and their resources. Four belief elements were studied teachers' self-efficacy beliefs for teaching statistics concepts, value of statistics in everyday life, value of statistics for students, and place of statistics in the curriculum. Correlation analysis was used to look at the possible relationships between the belief elements and teachers' resources. Findings include that teachers' belief about the value of statistics seems to be a central belief of those studied, and teachers' previous experiences teaching statistics has a significant association with teacher's beliefs.
  • Poster Session: Teachers' understanding of ratios and their connections to fractions
    NCTM 2015 Research Conference
    Boston, MA
    Monday April 13th 2015
    Presenters:
    - Gili Nagar*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    - Travis Weiland*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    - Chandra H. Orrill*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    - James P. Burke*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    (5:45pm - 6:45 pm)
    The study examined teachers' understanding of the relationship between fractions and ratios. We found that participants hold multiple definitions for ratios; they used specific vocabulary; and they expressed additive strategies rather than multiplicative relationships. These findings have implications for professional development.
  • Poster Session: Analyzing coherence of teacher's knowledge relating fractions and ratios
    NCTM 2015 Research Conference
    Boston, MA
    Monday April 13th 2015
    Presenters:
    - Travis Weiland*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    - Gili Nagar*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    - Chandra H. Orrill*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    - James P. Burke*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    (5:45pm - 6:45 pm)
    In this study, we use a new analysis tool, Epistemic Network Analysis (Shaffer et al., 2009) to demonstrate and highlight connections among knowledge resources that middle school mathematics teachers evoke while relating fractions and ratios. Patterns emerged in the connections of teachers' knowledge resources that were used to group the teachers.
  • Poster Session: Investigating the development of secondary science methods students' orientations and practices toward teaching science
    NARST 2015 Annual International Conference
    Hyatt Regency Chicago
    Chicago, IL
    Sunday April 12th 2015
    Presenters:
    - Stephen B. Witzig*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    - Todd Campbell, University of Connecticut
    (4:15pm - 5:15 pm)
  • Conference Presentation: A discursive approach to support teachers' development of student thinking about functions
    18th Annual Conference on Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education (RUME)
    Pittsburgh Marriott City Center
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Friday, February 20th 2015
    Presenters:
    - Beste Güçler*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    - Heather Trahan-Martins*, Kaput Center, UMass Dartmouth
    (10:55am - 11:25 am)
    This study is based on a teaching experiment in a post-secondary classroom and examines how an instructional approach that promotes high school teachers to reflect on their own discourses help them develop their thinking about student learning about functions. The findings indicate that eliciting the teachers' discourses in the classroom and making them explicit topics of discussion helped teachers reflect on and recognize their own difficulties about functions. The discursive approach used in this work also helped teachers develop their thinking of student difficulties about functions and the strategies they can use to address those difficulties.

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